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and anyone who's qualified to speak on national defense argues nuclear weapons has changed everything. we will never again have another previously in the period he can't move them from ship to shore without nuclear weapons in the army uses this as an argument to radically reduce or perhaps even abolish the marine corps. the marines fight back and they went. as early? as 1947, they start? arguing that the? big word wit? nuclear weapons is probably not? going to happen. they say, how are you going to? keep stability in the cold war? periphery if all you have to something that can add nice??? people.??????? no, you need forces that can do? a wide ?range of famous???? humanitarian release,?????? peacekeeping, disaster movies, small stability? operations.? they start arguing and 47.??? by 56, the height of the cold?? war they argue explicitly.?? where the soviet union was goin? to happen. you need capable? nonnuclear?? forces that arrive immediately and do lots of things th?at we? are that jack of all trades??? service. so by the late 40s, early 50s, they a
? was at a defense mechanism by the defense department? >> guest: no, it was a purely preemptive effort to slow the nuclear weapons processing capability of iran. >> host: you mention charlie miller and mr. miller is in st. louis and he joins us today on "the communicators." mr. miller, what was your goal in breaking into the iphone? >> guest: in that particular case it was for a concept like robert mentioned. they had hackers across the world and they had various devices. if you break into a device you can wind some cash in the device also. i won the contest a few times. earlier my career was more about showing things like iphones or you know, apple software were vulnerable because it really was an believe that it was but now it's just -- i have shown vulnerabilities in the iphone and attacks where i can send a text message to the iphone and taken over. all these are fixed now. part of the contest is all these vulnerabilities being fixed. a fun way to show off your skills and so everyone gets protected by the attacks it. >> host: how long did it take you to break into this iphone and from wher
stronger defense. let me welcome now a person steeped in cyber, a member of president obama's gemmer circle, psychiatry homeland security janet napolitano. [applause] she's going to give a few remarks of the podium and then we are going to sit down for discussion and welcome your questions as well. and along with running americas homeland security department come and the whole range of responsibilities from terrorism to natural disasters, and i just always loved to mention this that before coming to washington, she of course was the governor of arizona. she chaired the national governors' association, and she was the very first female valedictorian at the university before she got her doctorate. i love that. miss napolitano. >> good morning everybody. i thought i would do is give you a little update on the storm in part because as mentioned, disaster response is one of the key elements of the department of homeland security. fema as part of dhs and as you will see in my comment, there is an analogy to cyber and cybersecurity that i want to be able to draw for you. but we all know that sandy
of what defensive weapons were and not getting into all the details there but there's a struggle to prove with the understanding is. the long-range bomber to the americans have about 750-mile range that they were also very old. they were obsolete and not a match for the american defense in the southeast united states. but the problem was, and let's backtrack. kennedy himself did not think that this was a particularly big problem and it comes through on the tapes is the one who is the least worried about the il-28. he is actually on paper a few times saying things like we don't want to get hung up on these. i fell in reasonable trying to get these avenue is trying to put himself in khrushchev's position but he he is actually not particularly thinking itself but his advisers around him are. robinette macnamara is one of the most vocal about this and he says look we have to get these out. even if they are not a military threat in a clinical sense, the american public these are not going to be allowed to stay because we can't -- and george buckley argued for getting rid of them so kennedy is
arm of the nation's defense. but in the daily activities that we conduct, we do a lot of things that are important not only to the members of the military and the members of this country, but that have a significant effort in advancing the well-being of others in the world. so, we tend to think of the obvious things. we stand for freedom of choice. we stand for people being able to go about their lives free from oppression and things we know a lot about. but in the process of doing that, we had a large group of people and the department of defense. they need medical care, and because many of them are working at a very high operations tempo and under a lot of stress, we want them to be in the absolute highest level of health that we can possibly provide. and so, we have a very, very healthy group of folks, and we work overtime to make sure they stay healthy. in the process of doing that, we've learned a lot about people, diseases, physiology and on and on and on. one of the things we have to offer, we in this case i believe being the department of defense in this country is shari
new york times." >> host: and what was its purpose? was it a defense mechanism? was it the defense department? >> guest: no. it was purely a offensive, preemptive effort the slow the nuclear weapons processing capability of iran. >> host: well, you mentioned charlie miller, and mr. miller is in st. louis, and he joins us today on "the communicators." mr. miller, what was your, what was your goal in breaking into the iphone? >> guest: well, in that particular case it was for a contest, like robert mentioned. they have this contest every year, hackers across the world enter it, and they have various devices. if you can break into the devices, you win some cash and the device itself. so that was my goal. i won that contest a few times. earlier in my career it was more about showing that things like iphones or, you know, desktops running apple software were vulnerable because it wasn't believed that it was, but now it's just, you know, i've shown vulnerables in iphone, i've found attacks where i can take over an iphone in the past. all these are fixed now because part of the contest is
than defensive. some said to kennedy and around the table that, you know, these could be a threat to the hemisphere, cuban subversion, which was greatly feared. in fact, the big fear was that not so much that cuba was a threat, but it was spreading to other countries, and brazil, was feared, would be a second cuba. kennedy and the advisers, tell me, the tapes you studied carefully in the aftermath, and i should mention, of course, david is going to be publishing, been editing volumes of the transfers -- come back to these later -- never accepted khrushchev's public rationale to deploy them, which was to detour an american invasion, detour another bay of pigs, but with the american forces, not cubans. they always put the worst case analysis and why all of these materials were there. is that fair to say that that view never shifted even though some of them were aware of the overt american operations against castro and intended to overthrow castro? >> guest: i'll get the first part of the question there too because i think it's interesting. there's an aspect that came through in rece
defensive and even some of the forces, there were some who said to kennedy these could be a threat to the hemisphere this is cubans subversion which we felt the big fear was not so much cuba was a threat they could be spreading to others like brazil might become a second cuba. kennedy and his advisers, to leave the states that you said to the custody does it carefully in the aftermath and i should mention that of course david is going to be publishing and has been editing volumes and we will come back to this never accepted christian's congressional for deploying these weapons to deter the invasion and the bay of pigs but with american forces, not cuban so they always put the worst-case analysis. is that fair to say that never shifted even though some of them were aware of the covert american operations against castro? >> guest: let me get the first part of your question, too bad because that's interesting. there was an aspect that has come through. first of all timothy naftali has brought out -- we've been talking about the frogs and the loaners. >> host: the delivery vehicles. >>
groundwork, but from an arab perspective, the same integrated air defenses in trying to kill fighter jets. so given that the skies are permissive, the jones have been able to roam around free and i think false conclusions have been drawn and decent people who want to know better, who are thinking, look how well these things work. we could just use them all the time. i've nothing against drones. they do some things i would want to do. i don't want to orbit over a point and take pictures for 12 hours. my tail would go to sleep and i don't want to do that. but by the same token, they are followed by a guy who's looking through a tiny soda straw of a few. he's not a pilot sitting there on the scene. i don't know of anybody and any ground forces that would rather have a drove overhead then i fighter, just because they will combat situation. you can plan it, you can walk out the door at the best plan in the world and it's going to change, guaranteed. if it doesn't start apart completely, it will fall apart mostly. it's hard to adapt and change to that if you're sitting in a trailer tent doesn't mil
and so-called defense. would you agree that we need reform this as well, it is nothing that would save us money their? >> yeah, that's okay. i think that there are two sides of the same equation. rand paul says that we cannot cut the debt or do something to address the deficits without looking at domestic spending and four in spending. that's how we will have to compromise. would you come up from the liberals perspectives they we need to do something with the entitlement system. maybe some way to save money. >> we have done that. obamacare is deficit reduction. it quantifies specifically because a lot of it is experimental. most folks who look at this thing the main drivers of deficit and debt is excessive health care spending. he doesn't deny your health care that you need. the obamacare plan is to try on a bunch of things and see what works the best. let's learn as we go. so it strikes me as very shortsighted. even if you don't like it from the get-go, i was not onboard in 1996, we gave it a shot. in some ways, it worked better than i thought it would. but it was good to try it and see
or a third-party leaks sensitive national defense information, that is really our focus. i mean, i am not aware of cases in my district where an allegation is by the defense or a third party that there was something and toward going on on behalf of the information that was leaked. and so, you know, as ken said, there are numerous structures in place these days for whistleblowers to report information. that is true, even in the justice department. our former inspector general is here, and the hajis have structures in place, have structures in place to receive those kind of allegations of waste, fraud, abuse, you know, illegal activity, what have you. and it seems to me that that is -- that is the proper recourse if the government employee believes that something untoward is going on with the structure of the congress. and i don't think that the justice department would, you know, would necessarily expect to get a referral from an intelligence agency and a case involving this sort of thing. >> let's take a couple of questions from the audience. i ask you to please be sure and to the poi
to the future in as we look at a new defense strategy as we try to work through what the roles of the different services are, defense strategy, i also remind everybody that wall street will be downsizing during this time. the army, who at the beginning of calendar year 12 was popular will go down to 490,000 in the active component by the end of 17. we have significant deployed commitments. we are downsizing our army, and we are now looking to the future. one of the main things is granted make sure we have the right mix but i always talk about fashion executive arm and i really pay a lot of attention to. that's in strength, modernization and readiness. because in general terms those are the drivers of our budget. went to keep those imbalance. we want to learn from the lessons of the future, past drawdowns. some of the lessons that you can't get out of balance, because you get out of balance you start have been unready army. which leads to a hostile army, and, of course, was talk about the army of the task force and its impact and is an preparedness as it was asked to go into korea post-world war
the defense of marriage act was struck down by the courts. do you support this line do believe to believe marriages only between a man and a woman? dold: i've been clear from the beginning of my campaign that i believe -- life is hard, having a career's heart and having someone to be standing by your side in tough times but also in good times. if two people want to commit to a lifetime, god love them. >> moderator: brad schneider? schneider: i don't want to prevent to loving individuals from having a life together. one of the reasons why i supported a piece of legislation that would allow domestic partners who have health benefits and be able to be on their partner's health benefits and i've come forward with my party to say i believe civil union should be acceptable so we want to make sure they have these rights but i do believe marriage is between a man and a woman. dold: this as two distinct classes of people and people that want to make this commitment -- >> moderator: congressman's dold do you think that is
. it is in the military. the real compromise is conservatives who believe in a strong national defense have to realize there is waste in the military and domestic. the pentagon says it is too big to be audited. that is an insult. they need to me we need to figure how to save money in the military $124 billion are and accounted for. >> host: how do for see the debt ceiling is sequestration debate? >> i did not vote for the last one. i will but only if the balanced budget amendment. you need to be hard core. last year we added statutory caps. we have exceeded those a dozen times they bring a bill to the floor to say you're not spend more we raise the point* of order. 80 at a plundered will say we don't care about the rules they routinely ignored them. a rule says have the bill on my 48 hours. it is not enough but last year they put up one at 12 hours. i made a point* of order. they said so what. that is why people are not happy. they do not obey our own rules. >> talking to senator rand paul his first book the tea party goes to washington and his new one, a government believes. one of the side issues is
said the defense and battery the defense was so strong that it would take of massive force to relieve him successfully beyond united states army and navy so rarely he said i cannot maintain myself but there is no way you can come help me. he expected he would be told to withdraw. coming down to the final crisis to send an expedition not to send troops more munitions beauregard said his delegation to tell anderson you have to surrender or we will reduce you perk up that point* he said i have to leave in today's i will fly back. beauregard took the information to mcgovern a. it was over peace anwr. if he would specify when he will leave them don't take him out. then anderson said i will leave it noon april 15. unless i receive different orders from my government or i reinforced at that time the confederates new the relief mission was on route to some of that answer would not do because he did not promise unequivocal a cell he was told firing would commence properly. and it did. he never made the proposal of those terms. >> but just to speculate did abraham lincoln know what was going to
anywhere close to what we know today. so sure we can at the 26 year old defense policy, a very easy fix. but what's going on in obamacare now is going to mean we never have a balanced budget. it's going to mean small business does not grow and we have to start growing this economy. so i'm saying what we have is the best in the world, we can tweak it, we can make a better. we need toward reforms would on all this defensive medicine using the sum state 30% of our daughters. but you don't let any be the perfect a good. >> just to be clear you support return to the system as it was because you have said in the past that you would be opened reform but it sounds like which are suggesting is around the edges and not significant over all wholesale speech that is correct or do not believe in a government takeover of health care but i do believe toward reform is absolutely needed. what we had was the best in the world. you don't let perfect be the enemy of good and end up with awful. >> congresswoman? hochul: that's a rather extreme position to say there's no way to improve our health care system
the elites, the incumbent industry. he didn't say that. in fact, he was a courageous guy. he cut defense budgets by 20% in the late 1950s and those defense cuts, budget cuts in the late 1950s or the number one reason we have silicon alley. a plot of radio engineers had moved out there. it's a beautiful part of the country. suddenly they didn't have jobs and those people said well, we want to stay here and they created eventually intel and all the rest of that, right? so we were in a very tenuous moment. at a financial crisis. there is a financial crisis that led to the crisis in ottawa industry. adding on top of that psychologically the failure of the big three automakers, tough. tough call. by the way, i don't know what anybody in the presidential election mentions this as a bush program. i have a chapter in my forward. i'm not concerned about partisan politics. we need to get history right. start on one administration continue to the other. that's not what it's about either. but what happened if we we let it go? it would've been on the manufacturing access, all these contracts out the
to the future and as we look at a new defense strategy as we try to work through what the roles of the different services are and the defense strategy i also remind everyone that we will be downsizing during this time. the army who at the beginning of calendar year 12 was a 570,000 will go down to 49,090,000 in the active component by the end of 17 so we have significant deployment commitments. we are downsizing our army and we are now looking to the future. one of the main things is we have to do is ensure we have the right mix so i talk about rea stats and the secretary of the army and i really pay a lot of attention to it. end strength, modernization and readiness. in general terms those are the drivers and we have to keep those imbalance. we want to learn from the lessons of the future of past drug downs and some of the lessons is you can't get out of balance because if you get out of balance you start to have an unready army which leads to a hollow army and of course we always talk about in the army task force and its impact and unpreparedness as it was asked to go in to korea forced world
to national security, and that no court has ever accepted a defense of an proper of a document, and that millions of federal employees sign nondisclosure agreements when they're ready and classified programs, saying that they realize that disclosure of the classified information will damage the national security, it's actually quite hard to see why most disclosures of classified info aren't at least potentially prosecutable under the espionage act main section. moreover, this not just the espionage act. there are a number of the statutes, criminal statutes. perhaps most notably 18 -- is the general that and conversion statute. it criminalizes a theft conversion of property or other things of value of the u.s. government. most circuits, although there's some split, reader that should cover intangible information including classified information as well as tangible documents. so 641, and most of the country, seems like you could catch all classified information leaks, and much more. and, finally, the whistleblower laws are very little protection for defendants in these cases. in
's also true that the disclosure of certain highly classified sensitive national defense information security grounds the protect the secrecy of information critical to the national security and the right to free speech and the value of the informed citizenry is not absolute to the nation's security as the fourth circuit said in the u.s. versus morrison they said public security can be compromised and to raise the information is needed for democracy to function and the physical security which a functioning government requires or as the district judge in the district of virginia couple of years ago he wrote to the defendant's first amendment challenge to the espionage statute is the tension between the government transparency so essentials of the space society on the one hand and the government's equally compelling need to protect the disclosure information that could be used by those that wish to do the nation harm. the tension between the two principals, the first principles as i call them is not one that will necessarily resolve this morning but i mention them because it does and f
-- [inaudible] and given that we have very recently, only last night, met with the secretary of defense. would the prime minister meet with me and other interested members to discuss this issue? >> i'm always happy to talk to colleagues about this issue, as i know the ministry of defense and the secretary of state is. as he knows, we've had to make difficult decisions to put in place the future structure of the army with 82,000 regular soldiers and a larger reserve of 32,000 territorial army soldiers. i think that is right. clearly we've had to make some decisions about the regiments and battalions, and we were trying to save as many as possible. i think the proposals have taken that into account but, of course, the defense secretary will go on listening to representations. >> [inaudible] >> mr. speaker, will the prime minister confirm that the changes to child benefit due to be introconstitutioned in january -- introduced in january this year, next year, is -- that the cost of that, the overall cost is very much over 100 million pounds? >> the changes that we are making to child benefit where
the defense to these foia suits is something about the special diplomatic currency of nonofficial acknowledgment, that puts it in the best light. the most negative light is, um, that that kind of just allows the government to get all the upside without allowing domestic watchdog groups like the aclu to leverage the disclosure for details that matter to a lot of people about procedures, legal standards, collateral damage and the like. um, i think somewhat complicating the question of, you know, the normative question of whether this is, um, good or bad or just or not is, um, the counterfactual. you know, in a world in which there wasn't this kind of quasi-authorized or authorized talking about droneses, do we see, you know -- it's not necessarily a world of more frontal, official acknowledgment in which we're having a more pristine, you know, rich, democratic conversation about drones with more integrity. it might be a world in which there's no disclosure or far less disclosure about drones at all. so it's, i find, very vexed and difficult these kind of high-level, normative questi
. there are some challenges at the aerospace and defense industries , where classified material is to be protected. but in the engineering field, the banking field come in the telecommunications field, the education field and the consulting and providing its services and maintenance and operations and logistics field, the opportunities there limited only by the imagination. could you elaborate a little bit on how this is going in your view and for boeing in particular for seizing this opportunity and taking saudi arabia and students before they returned to the kingdom, where they expected to know a lot more than actually they would know, unless they have the practical hands-on experience. >> well, it's going well in dealing with the initiative of leadership and american firms we are seeing some success. boeing has a london presence as mro facility there in the airport. so they have a foothold to do that. i mention emd. this last summer and across the company summer high your program for students. they've got a 60 plus year presence there, so bill swanson, ceo clearly understands the value. here's
. information relating to the national defense, it's a statutory term. presumably, congress has the power to give content or further content o that statutory term. so i'm with john and glenn on that point. i think maybe the better solution is process where there's noticing common rulemaking where there's a proposed set of standards, and individual agencies have to show up outside the context of the case where the politics are going to skew the considerations and to say here's a general category in which it could be included. i mean, i think that would be an interesting exercise if nothing else. >> with, perhaps, constant review -- >> yeah. >> so that it can change over time, right? glenn, do you have anything to add? >> in response to your question, i think the threat can be immeant or a long-term threat and can still be threats that need to be addressed in the national security context in the declassification review. what struck me when we were doing our reviews was not the imminence argument, but the mosaic argument that this alone won't be a threat to national security, but you combine
. and a means forgoing these across-the-board defense cuts that, this man heinrich supported so that we don't lose another 20,000 jobs next year. that's what i will do in the united states senate and i look forward to the discussion this evening. >> martin heinrich, your opening statement. heinrich: growing up my dad was an electrician. my mom worked in a factory. they worked hard and stretched every dime but there were still tough times along the way. so, i know what it's like to struggle in a tough economy. and i'm running for the senate because i want our children, yours and mine, to inherit the kind of country that we all believe in growing up. an america where you prosper if you work hard and play by the rules. i want you to know that my priorities are mexico's priorities. protecting social security and medicare. tax cuts for the middle class, keeping our promises to our veterans and making college more affordable for everyone. i come home nearly every weekend so i can hold the job fairs to meet with the mexicans and raise my family. i've always fought for the things that matter most t
online chat, the question is last week the defense of marriage act was struck down by the courts. do you support this law, and do you believe that marriage is only between man and a woman? brad schneider? schneider: i believe two people -- life is hard. raising a family is hard, having a career is hard. having a partner to do that together, having someone to be standing by your side in tough times but also in good times. if two people want to commit for a lifetime, god bless them. >> i don't want to prevent two loving individuals from having a life together. one of the reasons why i supported, in essence, a piece of legislation that would allow domestic partners to have health benefits and be able to be on their partner's health benefits, and i've come forward to say i believe that civil unions should be acceptable. so we want to make sure that they have these rights, but i do believe marriage is between a man and a woman. >> i believe two people who want to make this commitment, it should be marriage. this is why the human rights campaign gave me their endorsement. >> moderator: congres
saturday morning at 10 eastern on c-span. >> the british defense committee is holding a series of hearings looking into the progress and security situation in afghanistan. tuesday members heard from the british ambassador to nato, the joint forces commander and the deputy commander for nato's afghan training operations. the two-hour hearing focused on several topics including the 2014 timetable for nato and british troops to withdraw from afghanistan. the threat of green on blue attacks and training the afghan forces. nato and u.k.-armed forces have been in afghanistan since october of 2001. this is just under two hours. >> whale come to all of you -- welcome to all of you to evidence session on afghanistan which we are using today to look at what the current state of operations are and who is in afghanistan and how well the after began national security -- afghan national security forces are doing and how well we are going to be planning for withdrawal from afghanistan. and i, therefore, would welcome as full evidence as you are able to give at the current state of planning for all of thi
it to the future in the new defense strategy as we try to work through what the rules of the different services are to the defense strategy, i almost remind everyone that going to be downsizing during this time. the army who went to beginning of county or 12 will go down to 490,000 active component by the end of 17. so we have significant deployed commitments. we are downsizing our army and now looking to the future. the main thing is we have to ensure we have the right mix. there was talk about the secretary of the army and i pay a lot of attention to. that's modernization, readiness. because in general terms, those are the drivers of our budget. you have to this imbalance. we want to learn from the lessons of past drawdown. some of the lessons is to kick it out of balance because if you get out of balance come you start to have an unready army, which leads to a hollow army. of course they talk a lot about task force smith and its impact and unprepared and assesses us to go to korea post-world war ii. we don't want that to happen again. for the secretary of the army and i have been clear that
including his deputy assistant secretary of defense for asia pacific, director of the national security council staff, deputy special counsel to the president and the white house, and why do so at the department of treasury. for his service he received the department of defense medals for distinguished metal service and for outstanding public service. user doesn't officer in the u.s. navy, the joint chiefs of staff, and chief of naval operations special intelligence unit. doctor campbell received his ba from university of california san diego, certificate in music and political philosophy from the university and soviet armenia, and his doctorate in international relations from oxford university what he was a marshall scholar. to my any of his richard solomon who is the assistant of state for for east asia and pacific affairs in 1989-1982 for president george h. w. bush. he served as president of united states institute of peace since 1993 during which time he oversaw its growth into a center of international conflict management analysis in applied programs. during his service in governm
prior to that have not come across your table? >> i mean, i'm sure the committee has, what the defense secretary said that transition is going as planned, and there's opportunity next year to make withdraws, the government already announced that some 500 will have been withdrawn by the end of this year. next year to take further decisions which the government has not yet taken, and you have to ask the defense secretary, you know, when he thinks that's possible. >> we are talking a time line of slightly more than two years, so i think things can change. i recognize that. >> yeah. i think the prime minister said what they're looking for is a glide past the end of 2014. the government will take those decisions when it's ready. >> what events will clearly dictate political decisions, not asking you to comment on political decisions, but dictate what happens -- >> i can give you confidence the figures announced by the prime minister out by december, that will be delivered. we'll be done. >> thank you very much. my last question, chairman, is is there any -- anybody heard anything about poss
climbed atop the roof until the man holding an rgb during my defense. i was visually acquire really out of the to call it air support when i was hit. everything went black. that day, my world went black, too. my daughters came home to care for their broken parent, my oldest return to washington state for his fifth tour aboard struggled to take care of their four -month-old son. my youngest daughter left her beloved naval academy to take care of her grieving mother father during months of brokenness, sacrificing her education. the people of richmond, georgia and surrounding areas welcomed matthew home with tears, flags and salutes. the streets are lined for 17 miles from the airport to the church. local choirs joined to sing at his memorial service as a method in church that helped raise him. knowing matthew had been an eagle scout and a local boy scout by collecting pens and paper and sent them to matthew's unit in afghanistan. a dear friend, jim bunn who is involved in media had a vision and the matthew freeman project again. he dedicated much time and energy to produce a short film th
's defense and to new mexico's economy and i ask your support and your vote. >> moderator: i think both candidates for participating in tonight's debate. it was informative, and lining and the more informed choice thanks to candid and his son pointed questions. and i thank kfox for participation in the debate and sundays will make the endorsement for u.s. senate. in addition the story that is independent of the endorsement will publish on page one that profiles the race. and don't forget to vote. thank you. [applause] >> a few minutes ago i called president bush and congratulated him on his victory. and i know i speak for all of you and all the american people when i say that he will be our president and we will work with him as the nation faces major challenges the head and we must work together. >> i just received a telephone call from governor dukakis. [choosers]] i want you to know he was most gracious. his call was personal and genuinely friendly and it was in the great tradition of american politics. >> this weekend on american history tv, 20 years of presidential victory and conc
. >> first one he's in his office in april of 1987 and he was having a meeting with brown, former defense secretary for jimmy carter and just going over parts of his program. i think brown was an informal advisor to his campaign, we're in his house office and i was just siting in -- sitting in a chair while this discussion was going on. i was listening to howard brown. >> the other one. >> this is what i call the dead tired at 5:00 p.m. shot. it's live at 5 in boston and it's that whole look of being wired up to the electronic media, getting a free spot on the news, and spelling it is what you want to tell but looking -- just waiting to go on for the green light to go on, the cameras, and he has that zombie expression on his face. >> >> and these two. >> this was in a factory in new hampshire. where he was listening to a factory worker and seemed to be impatient with it and the last photograph was taken after the faneuil hall debate. we had driven that evening from boston up to manchester in a blizzard and everybody decided, the reporters and can't date, to -- candidate to go down to the
the on a regular basis -- in defense of their friend who are going to be deported to countries they have never known. thee these are dream act students tens and thousands that graduate high school every years. there's a kid brought in to the country at age 2 from honduras. the mom in the mental asigh limb. only when he pays a parking ticket does he find out before going college he's not documented. he didn't know. he's going to be deported. he doesn't speak spanish. we ask people the question, should that person be deported a very different than about -- thing a gracious of the campaigns -- might occur from the individual stories an instrumentally the broader movement bigger national change. so you >> you mention any of the cause are -- is there a conservative an long. >> we see more conservative campaigns. started be conservative. we don't know until we en-- there's a case where in the target ends up about a week before thanksgiving last year they announce that all the workers the first time are going to have to work on thanksgiving. there's a worker in kansas and starts a petition gets 150,0
is democrats play defense. they have a number of vulnerable republicans, and then it's a game of they might -- if either member, lose one of their own, just broke even rather than eating into the 25-seat gape they need. >> back to that in a moment, but talk about individual races, and i want to begin with upstate new york outside of buffalo. winning a special election, trying to preserve a democratic seat in new york 27. >> kathy is revered in the, you know, well-loved in the democratic party because of that special election win. she's now facing a more republican district than she faced before. she's facing chris collins, eerie county executive who can be a polarizing figure saying it's a badge of honor, i'm not here to get along to move along. the republican nature of the district is probably dragging here down, even though she might be the more personable candidate in the race. >> down south florida, 18, congressman west, a tea party republican trying to keep his seat for second term. >> allen west returning against patrick murphy, not the former congressman of pennsylvania, but this is
sure we fully fund the military to make sure we are going to always have the greatest military defense in the world. >> moderator: okay, thank you. mr. morning? morning: well, i'm clearly the peace through strength campaign. i believe that if you look up something like the pet row dollar and tie the fact that our monetary scheme is tied to oil, you'll see a good part of our foreign policy not just in the middle east, but elsewhere is tie today all the of the worst decisions we've made. and i'm opposed to just about anything arrive seen coming out of washington, d.c. for the last 70 years or so. we've not had a year's peace, we've not had a declared war since world war ii. all of that's immoral, and it's not working. i would say that what we ought to be doing is peace, commerce, healthy skepticism with all nations and entangling alliances with none. >> moderator: thank you. mr. donnelly? one minute. donnelly: well, first and foremost, osama bin laden is dead. in regards to iran, they cannot get a nuclear weapon. it is, it is a nonnegotiable point. what you've seen so far with the sancti
? for example, it seems to me that they are generally satisfied with defense cooperation and have accepted and cooperated on sanctions, but they have considerable concerns about war and considerable concerns about the consequences of iraq and what our policy is in syria, and certainly palestine. so would anyone like to comment about that? >> can everybody hear me? so, i think part of iran's favor is isolating itself from the neighborhood in terms that particularly the gcc states. under ahmadinejad since 2005, the islamic republic has done a lot to scare everybody in the region, through its nuclear pursued, but a range of other action. when you look at iranian policy before ahmadinejad, there was a tendency to seek some sort of cordial working relationship with the gcc states, including saudi arabia, especially saudi arabia. for example, rafsanjani really trying to be some of the tensions between iran and saudi arabia, followed much more policy toward saudi arabia and the gcc states. of course, the historic and ideological tension between the two sides never went away, but ahmadinejad has m
gave a very -- a defense of his opposition to capital punishment and all of a sudden we said does this guy have a human side at all? i think those things, we kind of see into the character of the individual. i think al gore over the years, because it is kind of, he was pointed out as a serial exaggerator and any one of those stories you could explain away -- though he never said he invented the internet. he said he helped create the end of that. invent we have a conception of a laboratory sitting at a computer and he was very important in terms of creating the internet through legislation but he had that story and then he had a story about he and his wife were the models for the book love story. theauther said no that's not really quite true so he kind of link all of these together and said okay he is kind of them serial exaggerator and that hurt him in in the long-run. >> is why did the gaffes for mistakes about president bill clinton, president george w. bush, why are those not fatal mistakes? >> i think they're at two things going on. one is what else is going on in the world o
that to them before. but at the same time he said he is running out of supplies he said the defense and batteries and such the confederates have built around fort sumter were so strong that it would take a massive force to relieve him successfully, a force that was far beyond the ability of the united states army and navy to provide at that time. so anderson really said look, i can't maintain myself fear, but there's no way you can, help me. anderson fully expected he would be told to withdraw. now, when you come down to the final crisis when lincoln decides what he's going to do is to send an expedition that will provide supplies to major anderson, though he did not send troops or munitions, when the confederate commander in charleston sent his delegation out to anderson to kill anderson that you've got to surrender, or we will reduce you. anderson at the point told them, look, i've got to leave in two days, by the 15th of april, so that's a factor he said if you come at me i will fight back. ball regard census information to my comment because he relies this is a question of peace
the fact that the forces he was enghting against was entrenched behind defensive lines, this meant that he was probably goins to suffer more casualties than the other side. but on a proportional basis, is casualties were actually lower than those of who lee. related to this was au can cons ooded ation.co grant realized that by the endbu game, by the virginia campaign of 18641865, he understood the fundamental arithmetic of the war.amental aretic every casualty that cost him a soldier could be replaced. every casualty that cost jennaea lee a soldier could not be replaced. we fight and fight and we are eventually out of fighters.ant' no oneof accused him of anything less than those most upright acm integrity. they did accuse him of being a o t too loyal to people who tooo advantage of their high office. there there's a great deal of exaggeration goes on.d it has been known as the age of corruption in american politics. the two great scandals of thef t era, the one that is in all thes test books and recited again and again, as the construction of the transcontinental railroad, in which member
important secrets, our defense egrets. we have skilled people working for us, working for part of the military that attacks a system all the time. the sooner they can get in, they close that breach. private business does not invest enough money in doing that to have the kind of protection that we should have come at given the kind of records that we have. the way i described as our technology has gotten ahead of our security. our technology is state-of-the-art and our security is for five years on once again, i want to thank you very much. i want to thank you for the work of the chamber and encourage you to continue your pursuits. i think you have made a tremendous difference. thank you. [applause] >> a discussion now on product safety with the former acting chairman of the consumer product safety commission, nancy nord. her remarks at the summit are just over 20 minutes. >> thank you so much, lisa. i am so pleased to be here. after testifying before congress a number of times, before the 2010/. it is nice to be in a friendly audience. i see a number of people here that i recog
and that is by your defense, we have to watch out for people who will inevitably make that mistake. you have to have measures in place go back and say, okay, we have to have that kind of auditing thing. >> yes, you have to assume that somebody is going to hit you eventually. it really helps to invest in understanding the tools that we practice using, what those tools look like and put in place pieces that protect them. i just got back from class on how to hack and i took my students through the toolkit, here's everything we did, here's here is what we look like coming here are things and tools that i have. so taking kind of a counter approach to understanding what is being thrown at me, what does it look like and where is the weakness, that is a important thing to. >> we need to make network of vendors of more awareness of what is out there. even the offense of toolkit,. >> one of the things that amplifies leaders in the world, that is hacking networks, let's say, just for example, nasa. hiring a guy like raphael mudge to go in and under a nondisclosure agreement from attacking it like crazy. and fi
this was some famous, recent secretary of defense said the knowns and the unknowns. i am stopping, it's my last sentence. [laughter] i hate when they -- baathist. [laughter] i couldn't help that. i couldn't help that. losing syria, as rumsfeld once said, maybe it's wiser to insist on iraqi compliance. if we ignore baghdad's support for us and the risk of a lingering and endangered civil war and spillover into iraq and elsewhere grows. losing syria as a strategic ally will not cause the collapse of the government in iran, although it could weaken ahmadinejad even more than he's weakening anyway. weakening baghdad by threatening maliki, though, could have a major unintended consequence, and that is this: could push maliki, push him closer to tehran and away from possible rapprochement with iraq's arab neighbors which, in my humble opinion, is not a good idea. thank you. [applause] >> okay, so in my role as non-baathist moderator -- [laughter] inviting abdullahal sham marry -- alshammari to speak. >> thank you, it's a pleasure to speak with you. i should talk about iraq, then about syria, but i th
for strong defense i will do what i think is right for the people of vermont. i believe that the free market and free mind people having more of their own money create wealth to encourage the entrepreneur is not to make war on the entrepreneurs is the best way to get the country moving again, and i ask the people of vermont to consider voting for me if you want change and want things to go the same way a vote for the incumbent. >> moderator: for the united states marijuana party. ericson: i know for a fact from years of litigation experience that one of the reasons there is such a disparity between the rich and poor is that there is a disparity in bankruptcy law. if you are a person and you have financial problems, you file for bankruptcy under one set of bankruptcy laws. but if you are a megacorporation you get to file under chapter 11 and get to expunge all of your debt. you don't pay what you go and then you go back into business again with a clean slate. this cause is vast disparity between people and it's got to stop. we've got to have the same bankruptcy law for people as for corporati
. this is important for couple reasons. when is it helps explain the knee-jerk defense of preferences that has often led by leaders, universities. they look at their university and the preferences are significantly more moderate in those contexts. the worst effects of "mismatch" are the second, third and lower tears. the second effect is it means even though only 25% of all colleges in america used are highly selective institutions they absorb so much of the talented pool of minority students that even schools say second state universities with special requirements to get in are going to have a large disparity which is significantly aggravated by these preferences. that means "mismatch" affects higher education. >> another two or three minutes. >> one thing we talk about is another sign of racial preference, prominent in the discussion which is the diversity interest of schools. one of the things research has shown that we talk about in the book is how much the diversity affects, moderated by the academic distance, when you admit students with large preferences they are less likely to socially inter
important for a couple of reasons. one is that it helps explain sort of the strong knee-jerk defense of preferences that often led by the leaders of the most elite universities. because they look at their universities, and in fact the preferences are significantly more moderate than those contacts. the worst affected mismatch are at the second, third and low were tears. the second effect of the cascade is that it means that even though only 20, 25% of all colleges in america are highly selective institutions they absorb so much of the talented pool of minority students that even schools say second-tier state universities that simply have threshold requirements to get that are still going to have a large disparity of the students of the qualifications which is significantly aggravated by the use of preferences in the schools and that means the mismatch is something that affects a swath of the education. >> how much time do i have left? >> one of the things we talk about is another side of the racial preferences and the prominent in the discussions which is the diversity interest the s
. according to this interpretation, then, hanoi's were was a defensive protected measure, although i agree that the southerner's cries for help were important to north vietnamese leaders, party leaders might have also had internal problems. their own internal problems on their minds when they made the decision to go to war. following an unpopular and unsuccessful land reform campaign facing increasing opposition and criticism from among the intelligents and major cities in north vietnam, and finding the road to socialism difficult with state plans not coming to fruition, party leaders concluded that revolutionary war in the south had the power to deflect powers in the north, wag the dog so to speak. in addition to parting the bamboo hedge that obscured decision making in hanoi and bringing them to center stage in the story, i recall how his military strategy prevented him from compromising at the negotiation table, and how war weariness affected the society, and how they were marginalized in the struggle, and how they were bullied #, and how america's allies in the saigon government manage
at all of the issue in the own politics. national defense he was a staunch anticommunist. and played an important role in right-wing anticommunist politics. it's one of the things that lead in to switch parties in 1964. he was a key figure in opposing labor unions. he did so alongside people like barry gold water. even though early in the career a staunch advocate of union in south carolina. back in the '30s and '40s. he switches in the '50s and '60s and becoming a die hard supporter of business against labor in '70s. its an important role in conservative even evangelical politics. he joins the board of bob jones university in 1950. he does to win votes in the country of south carolina. bob jones had moved to south carolina moved university and he needed votes in the south carolina. he lost the 1950 raise for the senate. and that began a long process a long relationship with strom with conservative moneyment lal and even evangelicallists who were looking to get involved in political process. we need understand the racial politics in the midst of these other conservative causes. these
's a document about the defense intelligence agency which is the defense department version of the cia. it basically says, our intelligence of weapons of mass destruction is terrible. we really don't know anything. and that is coming out at the same time that the administration is saying these things about, we're going to have mushroom clouds over new york. and so was their intelligence to say that there are weapons of mass destructions? yes. was it did? no. was there a lot of intelligence the other way? yes. one of the things that people forget, we sent the weapons inspectors back in. there with a bunch of you in inspectors and they said, we can't find anything. and that was not viewed as intelligence. that was viewed as let's make fun. and so, you know, it was a bad application of intelligence by people who thought they knew it with the answer was. >> yes. >> it sounds like based on what you say, a lot of the decisions made a based on faulty intelligence. i guess and just wondering, we are we pass the 500. we a lot of things on the rise in. >> actually, one of the more interesting co
to the corrections legislation. secretary of the treasury, tim geithner and "wall street journal," strong defense of the dodd-frank act, asking to remember the financial crisis that to those made come when you read about the hundreds of millions of dollars spent on lobbyists trying to weaken or repeal financial reform. the reforms are not perfect, but if they been in place, it would've limited the crisis. community banks, basel three capital requirements and increased dodd-frank regulatory burdens were intended for big banks and will be effectively putting community banks out of business. and she strangely enough, citigroup executive sandy while, in interview with cnbc score box. which is split up investment from banking, have banks be deposit takers come in the commercial real estate loans, have banks not risk taxpayer dollars, banks that are not too big to fail. former fdic chair, she would bear concluded the law clearly establishes framework that allows financial firms to fail while preventing catastrophic harm to the economy. it effectively ends too big to fail and taxpayer bailouts. and fina
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